Tag: Coronavirus

Business & Workers | Washington State Coronavirus Response

Questions about returning to work?

There is important information to know about unemployment as our economy beings to re-open. The state Employment Security Department has developed frequently asked questions about returning to work for employers and workers.

Safe Start plans and guidance for reopening

Visit our Safe Start page for more information about the governor’s phased reopening plan. That page also includes industry-specific guidance for safe reopening.

Business Response Center

Business owners and operators who have questions about financial assistance, return to work and other general inquiries can use our General Business and Return to Work Inquiry form to ask our Business Response Center team for answers. First, visit the frequently asked questions for businesses page to see if your question or concern is already addressed. If you’re unable to find an answer, please submit your question through our form.

How to file for unemployment benefits

Economic Recovery and Resiliency

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Businesses and employers – Coronavirus COVID-19 Response

The U.S. SBA offers the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and Economic Injury Disaster Loan and Advance (EIDL and EIDL Advance).

More about Paycheck Protection Program (PPP):

The SBA has resumed accepting PPP loan applications from approved lenders. The PPP is a loan program for small businesses, self-employed, independent contractors, nonprofits with a maximum of 500 employees, and it is intended to keep workers paid and employed. The loan amount is calculated based on payroll expenses with a maximum amount of $10 million at a rate of 1% for up to 2 years. The loan is forgivable if 75% of the loan amount is used for payroll, and no employees are laid off, or if laid-off employees are rehired before June 30, 2020. In addition to payroll costs, allowable expenses include mortgage interest, rent, and utilities. Submit your application as soon as possible, even if you need to rehire

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Combating the Coronavirus | U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Our nation and our economy are facing an unprecedented crisis. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is marshaling all its resources to help companies stay afloat and keep paychecks flowing to American workers and families; mobilize the business community to combat the pandemic; and help companies prepare for a safe, successful, and sustainable reopening of the economy.

No family and no business should go bankrupt as a result of the coronavirus.
 

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Resources & Guidance | Policy & Advocacy | Business Community Response
Economic Impact | The Path Forward

 

 

RESOURCES, GUIDES & WEBINARS

Help for Small Businesses

For a full list of resources, webinars, research and advocacy for small businesses, and to find out how you can help small businesses in your community, visit the Save Small Business Initiative.
Todas las guías para pequeñas empresas están también disponibles en español. Presiones en cualquier enlace a continuación para acceder a la

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Coronavirus: Amazon, Microsoft each donate $1 million to response

  • Amazon and Microsoft are each donating $1 million to a fund for Seattle-area rapid response to the coronavirus outbreak.
  • The COVID-19 Response Fund will dole out one-time grants to local nonprofits working with “disproportionately affected communities” that will be the most economically impacted by the coronavirus outbreak.
  • Both Amazon and Microsoft are based in Washington, where 19 people have died and nearly 150 have tested positive for coronavirus.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Microsoft and Amazon, two major Seattle-based tech companies, are giving $1 million each to a fund designed to mitigate the economic loss felt in the local area in light of the coronavirus outbreak.

The COVID-19 Response Fund launched Monday with more than $2.5 million in donations, which will go to one-time grants doled out to local community organizations. The response fund is not designed to fund medical response and health measures: Instead, funds are intended

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How to Save Money During the Coronavirus Crisis





Worried about what the fallout of the coronavirus crisis could mean for your money? Here are 10 steps you could take right now to help shore up your finances.





how to save money
Source: Jacob Lund (Shutterstock)





1. Ask yourself if you could be doing better with your home loan





If you’re trying to cut back on some expenses, one possibility is to look closely at your home loan and how much you’re being charged. Interest rates are at historically low levels, so now could be a good time to compare and find a better deal. Analysis of Canstar’s database of over 4,000 products, shows that there is a 4.13 percentage point difference in the lowest advertised standard variable interest rate and the highest.  For an owner-occupier borrower paying back principal and interest on a $400,000 loan at 80% LVR over 25 years, refinancing to that lowest rate could:





  • save them up to $990
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About the decisions taken by European bank regulators and supervisors in the face of the coronavirus crisis

Bank regulators and supervisors have taken a number of important measures over the past two weeks in reaction to the coronavirus crisis. In our view, those measures make a lot of sense in the current fire-fighting context. We consider that the two priorities of bank regulators and supervisors should be 1) to ensure that credit is extended to enterprises during these extremely challenging times, and 2) to preserve financial stability.  This is precisely what they are doing: the measures taken have to be analysed together and, seen through that lens, they show a high level of coherence.

Among those measures, the most noteworthy are:

  • Excluding from non-performing loans credit extended by banks to support enterprises facing liquidity difficulties and benefiting from state guarantees.
    • Comment: this is the best way to resolve the impossibility that banks would have otherwise to support the economy without endangering
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EU finance ministers agree on coronavirus rescue deal

DEAL REACHED. French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire (L) applauds past French Treasury Managing Director Odile Renaud-Basso (R) as they attend a European Union finance ministers meeting by videoconference in Paris on April 9, 2020. Photo by Ludovic Marin/AFP

DEAL REACHED. French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire (L) applauds past French Treasury Managing Director Odile Renaud-Basso (R) as they attend a European Union finance ministers meeting by videoconference in Paris on April 9, 2020. Photo by Ludovic Marin/AFP

BRUSSELS, Belgium – European Union (EU) finance ministers agreed a 500-billion-euro rescue on Thursday, April 9, for European countries hit hard by the coronavirus epidemic, but put aside demands from Italy and France for pooled borrowing.

The breakthrough came after the Netherlands softened its position on the crucial question of making needy countries commit to economic reform and outside oversight in return for assistance.

The Hague had blocked the talks two days earlier by insisting that Italy, or any other country in need, deliver on governance targets – which Rome saw as a shocking demand during a health crisis.

“Today we answered our citizens’ call for a Europe that protects,” Eurogroup

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Coronavirus stimulus money starts to flow into bank accounts-NBC News ~ Big Mache

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is a U.S. federal agency responsible for the collection of taxes and enforcement of tax laws. 6 hours Ago the IRS boosted on Twitter account Saturday that the first economic impact payments to bank accounts more will be coming very soon.
U.S Treasury Facility Prints Social Security Checks

We know many people are anxious to get their payments. That’s why the IRS will issuing all payments to qualifying Americans with direct deposit accounts that already the IRS set up had begun to receive their coronavirus relief payment.

 Tweeted Saturday By IRS:

— IRS (@IRSnews) April 11, 2020

Numerous Twitter users active also posted on Saturday and their leave questions about tweeted IRS  about topic -Coronavirus stimulus money starts to flow into bank accounts-:

 Frequent Questions tweeted Saturday :

Are you depositing based on which bank, state, or income bracket? I use the BankofAmerica. Any word

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U.S. weekly jobless claims top 6 million amid coronavirus pandemic – National

The number of Americans filing claims for unemployment benefits last week shot to a record high for a second week in a row — topping 6 million — as more jurisdictions enforced stay-at-home measures to curb the coronavirus pandemic, which economists say has pushed the economy into recession.

READ MORE: The Canada Emergency Response Benefit for COVID-19 — who’s eligible and how to apply

Thursday’s weekly jobless claims report from the Labor Department, the most timely data on the economy’s health, reinforced economists’ views that the longest employment boom in U.S. history probably ended in March.






Coronavirus outbreak: Trump says there’s plenty of ventilators, big order of medical supplies made to Walmart


Coronavirus outbreak: Trump says there’s plenty of ventilators, big order of medical supplies made to Walmart

Initial claims for state unemployment benefits surged 3.3 million to a seasonally adjusted 6.6 million for the week ended March 28,

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What Coronavirus Fears Could Mean For Personal Finance : NPR

Personal finance concerns related to the spread of coronavirus are mounting. NPR’s Audie Cornish talks with Michelle Singletary, a personal finance columnist for The Washington Post.



MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Today was the worst day on Wall Street in more than a decade. The S&P 500 was down more than 7%. The Dow Jones lost 2,000 points. All this stems from the outbreak of coronavirus and resulting uncertainty about the global economy.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For everyday Americans, the stock market is just one of many personal finance concerns about the spread of coronavirus in the U.S. There’s questions of sick leave, school closings, health care deductibles and down the road, what a sustained economic slowdown could mean for American workers.

We’re joined now by Michelle Singletary. She’s a columnist for The Washington Post. She writes about personal finance. Welcome to the program.

MICHELLE SINGLETARY: Thank you so much.

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